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Books & Reviews

‘One Little Lie’, by Sam Carrington: Book Review

One Little Lie asks the question ‘does a mother ever really know their child?’ It follows the journey of two mothers who have lost their sons, one to murder, and one to prison. Alice is the mother of a killer. Her son is in prison for murder and she bears the guilt of someone who blames herself. Her support group for parents with troubled children can only help so much. She knows only the forgiveness of one woman will alleviate her guilt.

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Books & Reviews

‘The General Theory of Haunting,’ by Richard Easter: Book Review

Star rating: ★★★✰✰ In 1809, Lord Francis Marryman has lost his wife. He desperately misses her and, in honour of her, decides to build a Hall in the Devon countryside. Two centuries later, K&K Publishing Company needs a last-minute venue for their New Year’s Eve party. Marryman Hall is the only place available, and when the day of the party arrives, a snowstorm means only a handful of people can attend, soon finding themselves snowed in with no phone or internet.

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Books & Reviews

‘The Best Bad Things’, by Katrina Carrasco: Book Review

Star rating: ★★★✰✰ A historical novel with a touch of noir, The Best Bad Things follows Alma Rosales, a shamed ex-Pinkerton agent looking to redeem herself. Her stealth and espionage skills lead her to a job with her ex-lover Delphine. Dressed as her alter-ego, Jack Camp, she infiltrates Delphine’s opium smuggling ring to find out where her missing product has been going.

Books & Reviews

‘The Lost Girl,’ by Carol Drinkwater: Book Review

Alright, I have to be honest before I start this review: I didn't finish this book. That's only happened twice before: Moby Dick and Love in the Time of Cholera, both of which bored me to tears (unpopular opinions, I know, but here we are). So all of the following opinions are based on only reading half of The Lost Girl. Read on if you want, I hope I don't bore you as much as this book did me.

Books & Reviews

Top Ten Tuesday: Books With Red, White and Blue Covers

It's been a while since I've done a Top Ten Tuesday post, I missed them. So here we go. Top Ten Tuesday is a list challenge run by That Artsy Reader Girl. This weeks list is books that have red, white and blue covers, in honour of the 4th July tomorrow. Or we can choose books with the colours of our own flag (green, white and orange in my Irish case).

Books & Reviews

‘Fiction Can Be Murder,’ by Becky Clark: Book Review

Star Rating: ★★★✰✰ A murder-mystery where the main character (and suspect) is a murder-mystery writer, you say? Count me in! Mystery writer Charlee Russo is having a fairly normal day, or so she thinks. A phone call to say her agent is dead rocks her world in more ways than she could have imagined.

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Books & Reviews

‘Baby Teeth’, by Zoje Stage: Book Review

Star rating: ★★★★✰ Zoje Stage’s debut novel Baby Teeth is a disturbingly entertaining look at being a mother to a problem child. Suzette wants to be a loving mother to her daughter Hanna. She wants nothing more than to have a happy and functional family. But Hanna has other ideas.

Books & Reviews

‘The Man On The Middle Floor’, by Elizabeth S. Moore: Book Review

Star Rating: ★✰✰✰✰ Three people living in the same building but barely knowing of each other’s existence. Karen is a doctor and researcher, doing a study on the rising rates of autism. Tam has just lost his job as a policeman and now spends his days between takeaway containers and whiskey bottles. Nick is trying to live independently with his Asperger’s but has to deal with visits from his grandfather disrupting his routine.

Books & Reviews

‘Rebel Sisters,’ by Marita Conlon McKenna: Book Review

Star rating: ★★★★✰ Starting in 1901, Rebel Sisters tells the story of three Gifford Sisters, Muriel, Grace and Nellie. Born into a privileged Anglo-Irish family, we follow them as they fight back against their mother’s expectations and become involved in the growing independence movement in Ireland.